Event video is becoming more and more popular as access to the most basic tools is as easy as turning on an app or two on your device of choice. Likewise, it is also becoming more and more specialized as the options for video production ran the gamut from a simple live update to a fully crewed single-camera multi-location film-style production. People will often say they want a video, but they don’t always know what kind of video they want. Often times, they don’t know what kind of video they need, either.

Because of this, when I consider an Event Video, I make sure I get a clear idea what the client needs the video for. Not only this, I also like to get an idea why the event is happening in the first place. I like to break this down into three tiers; Show, Event or Meeting.

Meeting

A meeting is the most basic sort of video coverage and usually requires the least amount of flash. Essentially, this is a mobile talking head. A camera or two covers a speaker as they deliver their presentation. This isn’t to say it is easy, of course. There are all kinds of complications that need to be thought through ahead of time. Where will the presenter be? What tech are they using to present? Who is in the audience? What sort of sound options are there? Do they want this to be streaming?

Because these sorts of projects may not be about aesthetics, there is always a good way and not-so-great way to cover them. Meeting videos are best used for webinars, internal communications, or documentation. They seldom have any real value for social media or broadcast use. They require a captive audience of some kind, you know, like in a meeting.

Event

An Event video is the middle tier. There is some aspect of meeting video with this content. Someone is going to be presenting something, but they will be doing it with a little more flash or a little more tech. There will be a little more emphasis on keeping the audiences attention.

These are usually multi-media events, with more attention paid to walk-in music, onscreen video, or IMAG. Each of these items requires a specific technical solution if they are going to be captured with the best fidelity.

In addition to documenting all of these aspects, you also have to consider the other uses or lifespan of this content. Will this go to broadcast or will it live solely online? Will there be a need for a highlight reel of more dramatic and exciting shots? Are the presenters or speakers going to request their segments for their own uses? Is this a once in a lifetime event or is it an annual that changes very little from year-to-year?

So, each of these questions open up a range of creative and budget decisions that should be considered. A thorough conversation with your video and marketing team will help get the best results.

Show

The final category is a Show. These productions pull out all the stops and have every detail focused on “razzle-dazzle” for audiences at the event and long after. Often times, there is considerable video and tech production months before the doors to the event open, and it behooves the event producer to include the video team in these plans as soon as the event is in pre-production.

A great collaboration can leverage many streams of content from the onset if they are part of this process. Furthermore, they can deliver event assets (videos, graphics, social) that are perfectly in tune with the brand and the message with much more cost-effectiveness.

Likewise, the video team can position all of its resources in such a way that the event produces a catalog of content that can be multi-purposed for months or years after the event.

Not every client has all the resources to put on a BIG show, it is worthwhile to think of an event of any size as a show. Ultimately, it’s a chance to engage your audience, develop your brand and produce content that has legs. As a video/content partner, I’m always excited to help elevate the production value of any event, and see the value in getting involved very early in the process. This is a total “win-win”.



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